Executive Orders and Memoranda with Regulatory Content [Updated 5/26/17]

Links are to the Federal Register except if publication has not yet occurred.

Executive Orders
Date EO No. Title
2017-01-20 13765 Minimizing the Economic Burden of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Pending Repeal
2017-01-24 13766 Expediting Environmental Reviews and Approvals for High Priority Infrastructure Projects
OMB Statement
2017-01-25 13767 Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements
OMB Statement
2017-01-25 13768 Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States
OMB Statement
2017-01-27 13769 Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States
2017-01-30 13771 Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs

Guidance

2017-02-02: Interim Guidance Implementing Section 2 of the Executive Order of January 30, 2017, Titled “Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs”;

2017-03-06: Spring Data Call for the Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions

2017-04-02: Guidance Implementing Executive Order 13771, Titled “Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs”

2017-02-03 13772 Core Principles for Regulating the United States Financial System
Presidential Memorandum
2017-02-24 13777 Enforcing the Regulatory Reform Agenda

Guidance

2017-04-28: Guidance on Regulatory Reform Accountability under Executive Order 13777, titled “Enforcing the Regulatory Reform Agenda” 

2017-02-28 13778 Restoring the Rule of Law, Federalism, and Economic Growth by Reviewing the “Waters of the United States” Rule
2017-03-06 13780 Protecting The Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into The United States
Presidential Memorandum
2017-03-13 13781 Comprehensive Plan for Reorganizing the Executive Branch
2017-03-27 13782 Revocation of Federal Contracting Executive Orders
2017-03-28 13783 Promoting Energy Independence and Economic Growth

Guidance

2017-04-28: Guidance for Section 2 of Executive Order 13783, Titled “Promoting Energy Independence and Economic Growth

2017-03-31 13785 Establishing Enhanced Collection and Enforcement of Antidumping and Countervailing Duties and Violations of Trade and Customs Laws
2017-04-18 13788 Buy American and Hire American
2017-04-21 13789 Identifying and Reducing Tax Regulatory Burdens
2017-04-26 13792 Review of Designations Under the Antiquities Act
2017-04-28 13795 Implementing an America-First Offshore Energy Strategy
2017-04-29 13797 Establishment of Office of Trade and Manufacturing Policy
2017-05-04 13798 Promoting Free Speech and Religious Liberty

 

 

Memoranda
Date Recipient(s) Title
2017-01-20 Executive Departments and Agencies Regulatory Freeze Pending Review
2017-01-23 DOS
HHS
USAID
The Mexico City Policy
2017-01-23 USTR Withdrawal of the United States From the Trans-Pacific Partnership Negotiations and Agreement
2017-01-23 Executive Departments and Agencies Hiring Freeze
2017-01-24 Executive Departments and Agencies Streamlining Permitting and Reducing Regulatory Burdens for Domestic Manufacturing
2017-01-24 DOL
Army
DOI
Construction of the Keystone XL Pipeline
2017-01-24 Army Construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline
2017-02-03 DOL Fiduciary Duty Rule
2017-03-27 EOP The White House Office of American Innovation

Update History

February 3, 2017
February 6, 2017
February 9, 2017
February 25, 2017
March 1, 2017
March 7, 2017
March 14, 2017
March 28, 2017
May 26, 2017

 

Congressional Review Act Joint Resolutions of Disapproval
[Updated 5/26/17]

The Congressional Review Act of 1996 (5 U.S.C. Chapter 8) provides Congress with an expedited procedure for disapproving regulations promulgated by a federal agency. A Joint Resolution of Disapproval must be passed by both the House and Senate and signed by the President. The table below lists Joint Resolutions of Disapproval that have been filed by Members. Passage by one or both houses, and signature by the President, is noted. Where one house has voted on a Joint Resolution of the other house, that vote is recorded parallel to the action of the other house. This table will be updated to reflect events.
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Joint Resolutions of Disapproval:
Voting trends

As of April 1, 2017, 13 Joint Resolutions of Disapproval (JRDs) have been approved by both houses of Congress, and President Trump has signed eight of them into law.  This is too few data to conduct any serious statistical analysis. Nonetheless, it is interesting the notice possible trends in congressional action.

Three hypotheses immediately come to mind:

  1. Early JRDs concern regulations that aroused the greatest congressional opposition.
  2. The longer it takes for the second house to vote to disapprove, the lower is the support for disapproval in the second house to vote.
  3. Congressional support for or opposition to a JRD is almost exclusively partisan.

Here is some early, and highly preliminary, analysis.

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Congressional Review Act Joint Resolutions of Disapproval
[Updated 4/1/17]

The Congressional Review Act of 1996 (5 U.S.C. Chapter 8) provides Congress with an expedited procedure for disapproving regulations promulgated by a federal agency. A Joint Resolution of Disapproval must be passed by both the House and Senate and signed by the President. The table below lists Joint Resolutions of Disapproval that have been filed by Members. Passage by one or both houses, and signature by the President, is noted. Where one house has voted on a Joint Resolution of the other house, that vote is recorded parallel to the action of the other house. This table will be updated to reflect events.
Continue reading

Congressional Review Act Joint Resolutions of Disapproval
[Updated 3/28/17]

The Congressional Review Act of 1996 (5 U.S.C. Chapter 8) provides Congress with an expedited procedure for disapproving regulations promulgated by a federal agency. A Joint Resolution of Disapproval must be passed by both the House and Senate and signed by the President. The table below lists Joint Resolutions of Disapproval that have been filed by Members. Passage by one or both houses, and signature by the President, is noted. Where one house has voted on a Joint Resolution of the other house, that vote is recorded parallel to the action of the other house. This table will be updated to reflect events.
Continue reading